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Home 
Our Mission 
Contact Us  
Disclaimer 
Acne Vulgaris 
Hairloss 
Atopic Eczema 
Psoriasis 
Skinageing 
Skin A to Z 
STD Centre 
 

Featured articles


Time marches on - The story of ageing

Learn what happens to the skin when we age - it's not just the skin but the foundation upon which it sits and the muscles that tug away at the skin that matter.


Basic skincare

Are you bewildered? Who would blame you - with the hundreds, perhaps thousands of skincare products on the market. Skincare need not be complicated. Learn the basics of skincare.


Healthy body, healthy skin

Ageing is inevitable - on a chronological scale but not on a biological scale. Learn how to stay biologically younger than your chronological age and your skin will benefit, as well.


Sunlight and your skin

Slip on a shirt, slop on sunscreen, and slap on a hat for healthier skin - "Slip-Slop-Slap" like the Aussies.

 
Breaking News 

Tazorac (tazarotene) Gel approved by the USFDA in June 1997 for the treatment of stable plaque psoriasis of up to 20 % of body surface area.

Metrogel (metronidazole) Gel received USFDA approval in November 1998 for the treatment of moderate to severe acne rosacea.

Elidel (pimecrolimus) Cream received USFDA approval in December 2001 for the treatment of mild to moderate atopic dermatitis in patients aged 2 years or more.

Botox Cosmetic (botulinum toxin) was approved by the USFDA in April 2002 for the temporary improvement of moderate to severe glabellar wrinkles in adult men and women, ages 65 and younger.

Finacea (azelaic acid) Gel 15% received USFDA approval in December 2002 for the treatment of mild to moderate acne rosacea. It is also marketed as Skinoren.

Protopic (tacrolimus) Ointment received USFDA approval in December 2002 for the treatment of atopic dermatitis in patients aged 2 years.

Amevive (alefacept) became the first biological therapy to be approved by the USFDA (in January 2003) for the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Alefacept works against psoriasis, in part, by reducing the number of T cells in the body.

Enbrel (etanercept) received USFDA approval in April 2004 for chronic moderate to severe psoriasis. Enbrel inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-alpha), an inflammation-promoting substance produced by activated T cells in patients with psoriasis.

Radiesse (calcium hydroxylapatite microspheres) received USFDA approval in December 2006 for facial aesthetic applications. It stimulates the body to produce new collagen and the improvement is immediate and lasts an average of one year or more.

Remicade (infliximab) received USFDA approval in September 2006 for chronic severe plaque psoriasis. Remicade inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-alpha), an inflammation-promoting substance produced by activated T cells in patients with psoriasis.

Humira (adalimumab) received USFDA approval in January 2008 for treatment of moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis. Humira inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-alpha), an inflammation-promoting substance produced by activated T cells in patients with psoriasis.

Raptiva (efalizumab) used for chronic and severe plaque psoriasis was withdrawn from the US market as of June 2009 due to increased risk of PML (progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy). Raptiva inhibits T cells, the immune cells that congregate in psoriasis plaques and trigger inflammation.

Sculptra®Aesthetic (injectable poly-L-lactic acid) received USFDA approval for for facial aesthetic applications. Sculptra stimulates the body to produce new collagen. The effect is gradual and can last up to two years.

Stelara (ustekinumab) received USFDA approval in September 2009 for the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis in adults.Stelera blocks the action of two cytokines IL-12 and IL-23, which stimulate type 1 T-helper cell responses and contribute to the overproduction of skin cells and inflammation.

 
Disclaimer
This website contains information on skin diseases, skin care, skin anatomy, sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and topical issues. It is not a substitute for consulting a doctor. Rather it is meant to provide information on the treatments available and self-help tips after the diagnosis has been confirmed by a doctor. oneSkin.com will not be liable for any complication or injury arising from the use of this information.  

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Skin A to Z
Learn about skin diseases, how they are treated and more importantly, what you can do to help your skin recover. 
 
Skin Anatomy
Learn about the anatomy (structure) and function of the skin. 
 
STD Centre
Information on sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), how they are transmitted, treated and how they can be prevented.